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Cities in the United States that look like little Europe

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TripIt surveyed more than 3,000 users to find out where Americans plan to go on vacation after the epidemic. The irresistible answer to this question was Europe. However, people said that if they could not go to Europe, they would rather go on a domestic trip to the United States. Here’s a list of the most European-feeling cities in the United States to help make both dreams come true, to pretend until international travel resumes.

Montpellier, Vermont

Montpellier, Vermont

The capital of Vermont is the very subtle, slightly western, fun, and European vibe of New England all together. The state and main street buildings remind us of the dusty Denver saloon. Its name goes back to America’s strong initial friendship with France, which explains why it feels somewhat like a French countryside. It has farmer’s markets, small shops and rolling green hills, all tied together with European architecture.

Levenworth, Washington

Levenworth was redesigned to look more German in the 1960s. It really looks like a small Bavarian mountain village. It brings in millions of tourists every year for that exact reason. The German-Americans who live here, including a Nutcracker museum to celebrate and boot Oktoberfest, have really found it quite authentic.

Levenworth, Washington

Levenworth, Washington

Salvang, California

Near Santa Barbara you can find Salvang, a small town that is quite Danish. It was originally settled by the Spaniards, who quickly occupied the Danish-Americans in the early 20th century. They wanted to start a Danish colony far away from the rest of America. A Lutheran church was built, and the rest is history. Seen from windmills, half-timbered architecture, Hans Christian Andersen Odes and even members of the Danish royal family, it feels like a little Denmark in California.

Salvang, California

Salvang, California

St. Augustine, Florida

St. Augustine actually lost to the oldest cities in the United States, New York and Boston, as well as Jamestown and Williamsburg. The Spanish-influenced city was founded by Ponce de LeāĻ¨n when he was looking for a fountain of youth. He left behind a splendid settlement that preserves a wealth of Spanish Renaissance architecture. If you visit Castillo de San Marcos and the Colonial Spanish Quarter, you will see the effects.

St. Augustine, Florida

St. Augustine, Florida

Holland, Michigan

Okay, it’s kind of like a gift, but Holland, Michigan really lives up to its name. It is a strange and charming little town full of rocks that will remind you of trapping around a European village. Like the European Holland, it has windmills and tulip gardens. This is the perfect place for a spring trip.

Holland, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

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